News // ROBERT REDFORD CONFIRMS HIS RETIREMENT

The upcoming heist film The Old Man & the Gun will be his final role.



For over 60 years, Robert Redford has charmed audiences in-front-of and behind-the-scenes of countless Hollywood classics. Now, after such a lengthy and lauded career, Redford has confirmed he is retiring from acting after the release of his upcoming The Old Man & the Gun. The film tells the true story of bank robber Forrest Tucker and his string of heists and prison breaks. Elisabeth Moss, Sissy Spacek, and Casey Affleck star alongside Redford, who plays Tucker. It's set to release next month after being screened at several film festivals.


Though he's now confirming his retirement, Redford hinted at the end of his acting career back in 2016, as reported by the Los Angeles Times. At that time, Redford insinuated that The Old Man & the Gun and Our Souls at Night, the 2017 romance with Jane Fonda, would be his final two acting roles.


With acting now out of the picture, the legend will continue seeking out directing and/or producing opportunities.


Redford made his first mark on the industry in his 20s when he was cast in Mike Nichols' Barefoot in the Park on Broadway. Film and television roles soon followed, including the film version of that play, which would cast him opposite Fonda for the first time.


Between the 1960's and the 1980's, Redford became a lucrative leading man, starring in classics such as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Way We Were, The Great Gatsby, and All the President's Men. His first foray into directing was with the family drama, Ordinary People, starring Mary Tyler Moore and Donald Sutherland. The film won four Academy Awards, including the prizes for Best Director and Best Picture.


In 1981, Redford founded the Sundance Institute, the organization behind the Sundance Film Festival, an important part of the independent film movement.


Over the course of his career, Redford has received four Academy Award nominations, once for acting (The Sting), twice for directing (winning for Ordinary People), and once for Best Picture (Quiz Show). In 2002, he received an Honorary Oscar for his support of independent cinema. He's also won five Golden Globe awards, plus the Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1994.


Other great performances from the actor include his turns in Jeremiah Johnson, Out of Africa, The Natural, The Horse Whisperer, and 2016's Pete's Dragon.

© 2018 by Scottie Knollin.

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