News // 'SCHINDLER'S LIST' IS SET TO RETURN FOR ITS 25th ANNIVERSARY

Steven Spielberg's epic won the Academy Award for Best Picture and has been called one of the greatest films of all time.



Like Jurassic Park this fall, Steven Spielberg's passion project, Schindler's List, is returning to cinemas in December in celebration of its 25th anniversary. The film showcases one of the most captivating looks at history, and the Holocaust, ever put to screen from one of the most prolific directors to ever stand behind a camera.


Re-releasing the film has come at a very perfect time in modern history, says Spielberg in a report from The Playlist. "When the film initially came out, it made one of the most incomprehensible acts of humankind accessible. It didn't make it understandable, but reachable to audiences to be able to explore it, to be moved in such a way to want to stand against all hatred, and know it is real and what can shockingly happen in the 20th and now the 21st centuries if we are not vigilant."


Schindler's List follows Okar Schindler (Liam Neeson), a Sudeten German businessman who save lithe lives of more than a thousand Polish-Jewish refugees from the Holocaust by employing them in his factories during WWII. Ralph Fiennes stars as SS officer Amon Goth, the film's antagonist. Ben Kingsley also stars.


Spielberg's magical eye gives the film an all-important, almost-documentary feel as it showcases the horrors of the Holocaust in visceral and dramatic (and violent) ways. It never crosses the line of being torture porn, but allows audiences to get a firsthand look at the disgusting acts that made up that time in history. Filmed in black-and-white, one of the film's most famous scenes involves a little girl in a red coat.


The film premiered in November 1993 before releasing wide on December 13, 1993. It was a huge box office success, earning over $321 million worldwide. It won 7 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. In 2007, the American Film Institute ranked it as the 8th greatest American film of all time. It is also preserved on the Library of Congress' National Film Registry, as of 2004.


© 2018 by Scottie Knollin.

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